Prisons in Norway

As a follow up to a recent post about abolishing prisons, this BBC News story on prisons in Norway makes an important point. Prisons there are beyond what many criminal justice reformers dare to hope for here. The setting is rustic, there are no barbed wires around and the guards who are called Prison Officer Assistants function like teachers, counselors, mentors. The whole idea behind the Norway prison system is that those who are in prison will one day be neighbors and so rehabilitation is opted over retribution, so that when they come out prisoners are better people than when they went in. Since in Norway the maximum sentence is 21 years all prisoners are eventually released. Each inmate has his own cell with TV, a bath and a view of the woods outside. They study trades, pursue degrees, take yoga classes, go into retreats when they need to. And what is striking especially when compared with US prisons is that there is no violence. Once in a while an inmate may act violently but the facility has none of the incidents of violence that are routinely expected in contemporary US prisons.  Each guard who has had at least 3 years of training, is assigned about 3 inmates, so the ratio is far different than  in the US and surely also makes a difference. After 2 years of this approach the recidivism rate in Norway has gone down to 20%.  Prior to that, it had been 60 to 70%. In the UK it’s about 50% and in the US it is 68% within 3 years and 76% within 5 years.

Of course this approach is expensive and that argument may be used by critics as a drawback. It costs the equivalent of about 98,000 British pounds per person. In the US the average is usually $30,000 but can be double that in some states. Economics tell us however, that there are social costs, and opportunity costs, and I suspect when all these are added together (not even factoring in the social good and humanity of the issue) the Norway type of prison may in the long run turn out to be cheaper.

2 thoughts on “Prisons in Norway”

  1. I just got my first reply from the prisoner on death row in Alabama I am corresponding with.
    According to him, the food is barely edible and he is allowed to go outside 2 times a week and is paranoid because another prisoner tried to stab him 2 years ago. Also EJI reports that Alabama prisons are overcrowded at a 138% capacity. We have much to learn from Norway about treating prisoners as humans we wish to help rehabilitate instead of making their lives a living hell and creating in them a sense of hopelessness and social rejection.

    1. Aren’t Alabama prisons among the worst in the US? What a horrendous existence! A lesson in gratitude for us, of all the things we take for granted. May your letters bring him some sense of worth and hope.

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